Sportswire

Sheds star in North Hornell Village Board discussion – News – The Evening Tribune – Hornell, NY

This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. No Comments Posted. Civil Dialogue Policy for Commenting on SantaMariaTimes.com We provide this community forum for readers to exchange ideas and opinions on the news of the day. Passionate views, pointed criticism and critical thinking are welcome. Comments can only be submitted by registered users. By posting comments on our site, you are agreeing to the following terms: Commentary and photos submitted to the Santa Maria Times (SantaMariaTimes.com) may be published or distributed in print, electronically or other forms.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://santamariatimes.com/sports/recreation/295ce54b-d71c-5a40-a4e5-7d0ead0e8e6a.html

14, 2015 @ 4:24 pm Updated Jan 14, 2015 at 4:25 PM By Ryan Papaserge/The Evening Tribune Posted Jan. 14, 2015 @ 4:24 pm Updated Jan 14, 2015 at 4:25 PM Social News NORTH HORNELL For the second straight month, the topic of sheds and property lines spurred plenty of debate inside North Hornell Village Hall. After debating the topic in a public hearing in December, the Village Board was challenged by a displeased resident over whether a neighbor’s shed was encroaching on his property.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.eveningtribune.com/article/20150114/NEWS/150119875/1994/NEWS

Engineer sheds new light on Boston molasses disaster | Boston Herald

In January 1919, a giant storage tank in the city’s North End ruptured, sending 2.3 million gallons of molasses pouring down city streets, killing 21 people. Ronald Mayville, a senior structural and metallurgical engineer with Simpson, Gumpertz & Heger in Waltham, has researched the disaster for years in his spare time. He tells The Boston Globe (http://bit.ly/1wZdmKQ ) the walls of the tank were at least 50 percent too thin and the type of steel used was brittle because it contained a low amount of the chemical element manganese, making it more likely to crack.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.bostonherald.com/news_opinion/local_coverage/2015/01/engineer_sheds_new_light_on_boston_molasses_disaster