Engineer Sheds New Light On Boston Molasses Disaster | Boston Herald

Sheds star in North Hornell Village Board discussion – News – The Evening Tribune – Hornell, NY

From 6 to 9 p.m., the Pirates players will be waiting on table for tips with all proceeds used to help the team fund raise items for the program, such as field improvements and equipment. There will also be a silent auction and a special wine tasting. For more information call 895-688-6487, ext. 3277 or send an e-mail to wdickey @ syvuhsd.org . SJ baseball fundraiser The St. Joseph baseball program will be holding a fund raising event on Saturday, Jan.
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In January 1919, a giant storage tank in the city’s North End ruptured, sending 2.3 million gallons of molasses pouring down city streets, killing 21 people. Ronald Mayville, a senior structural and metallurgical engineer with Simpson, Gumpertz & Heger in Waltham, has researched the disaster for years in his spare time. He tells The Boston Globe (http://bit.ly/1wZdmKQ ) the walls of the tank were at least 50 percent too thin and the type of steel used was brittle because it contained a low amount of the chemical element manganese, making it more likely to crack. His research was featured in the September edition of Civil and Structural Engineer Magazine.
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Yakima Herald Republic | Judge rules: Dairy polluted groundwater

Bill Dolsen

The North Hornell Planning Board had met several times since the public hearing regarding the placement of storage sheds and similar buildings related to the property line. Planning Board Chairman Joe Ingalls attended the meeting and read a letter he previously sent to the Village Board. Code Enforcement Officer William Rusby met with the planning board on Dec. 22 regarding the property, and according to Ingalls, referenced a local law which stated that a building permit was not needed for construction of “one-story detached structures” that could be used for storage purposes.
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Sportswire

The Center for Food Safety, a Washington, D.C., nonprofit, is a co-plaintiff that also assisted in the case. The judges 111-page ruling at times criticizes the company and its owners and officers, Bill and Adam Dolsen, writing that their defense appeared to minimize the potentially harmful human effects of consuming unsafe levels of nitrates, including Blue Baby Syndrome, a condition that can result when babies consume formula mixed with nitrate-contaminated water. Alarmingly, Defendant Cow Palaces briefing seems to suggest that this Court wait to act until a young infant in the area is first diagnosed with methemoglobinemia, a health effect that occurs at the lowest dose of nitrate consumption, Rice wrote. Affected infants develop a peculiar blue-gray skin color and may become irritable or lethargic, depending on the severity of their condition. According to the National Institutes of Health, the condition can progress rapidly to coma and death if not recognized and treated.
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